Texting while driving campaign

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Just 4 seconds changed 23-year-old Austin Breitenstein’s life forever.

” Austin was reading a very long text and he and his ex-girlfriend were having some issues.” says Julie Breitenstein, Austin’s Mother.

About 3-and-a-half years ago, he was driving late at night when he looked down to read a text from his ex-girlfriend and crashed his car.

“Austin was still alive but we didn’t know what his injuries were about 4:30 in the morning we were taken in to see him and found out that he had a traumatic brain injury which was very serious “

Austin received a craniectomy which is a procedure where doctors remove the sides of his skull to allow the brain to swell.

It’s the reason he’s even alive today, but it’s left him with problems communicating.

That’s why the “It can wait” campaign and law enforcement are pushing to warn young teens of the danger of texting while driving.

Sheriff of Shawnee County, Herman T. Jones says, ” this is life changing when you’re talking about someone that needs assistance just to go to the bathroom or to take a shower or just to eat or just to speak and to understand that two words can be that difference for you.”

Nearly 500 middle school and high school students checked out simulations showing those dangers.

Breintenstein says, she will do everything she can to help her son become independent once again.

Making a decision to not text behind the wheel.

 

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