Cat detained on illegal mission at Russian prison

In this Monday, May 5, 2008 file photo Russian army S-300 air defense missiles move during a final rehearsal of Victory Day parade at Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, right in the background, in Moscow. President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday, June 4, 2013 that Russia hasn't yet fulfilled a contract to send sophisticated S-300 air defense missile systems to Syria to avoid tilting the balance of power in the region. Russian officials have acknowledged that Moscow signed a deal for the delivery of the powerful missiles a few years ago, but have been coy about whether any of them have been delivered. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev, File)
In this Monday, May 5, 2008 file photo Russian army S-300 air defense missiles move during a final rehearsal of Victory Day parade at Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, right in the background, in Moscow. President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday, June 4, 2013 that Russia hasn't yet fulfilled a contract to send sophisticated S-300 air defense missile systems to Syria to avoid tilting the balance of power in the region. Russian officials have acknowledged that Moscow signed a deal for the delivery of the powerful missiles a few years ago, but have been coy about whether any of them have been delivered. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev, File)

MOSCOW (AP) — Inmates at Russia’s prisons have been known to bribe guards to obtain cellphones. But using cats as couriers?

Guards patrolling a prison colony in Russia’s north saw a feline on the fence and it seemed to be carrying something. On a closer look, they found a few cellphones and chargers taped to the cat’s belly.

The federal prison service said Monday that this happened on Friday at Penal Colony No. 1 near the city of Syktyvkar in the Komi province, 1,000 kilometers (some 600 miles) northeast of Moscow.

It wasn’t clear how the cat was supposed to drop off its loot.

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