Putin says dispute over Jewish manuscripts over

In this Monday, May 5, 2008 file photo Russian army S-300 air defense missiles move during a final rehearsal of Victory Day parade at Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, right in the background, in Moscow. President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday, June 4, 2013 that Russia hasn't yet fulfilled a contract to send sophisticated S-300 air defense missile systems to Syria to avoid tilting the balance of power in the region. Russian officials have acknowledged that Moscow signed a deal for the delivery of the powerful missiles a few years ago, but have been coy about whether any of them have been delivered. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev, File)
In this Monday, May 5, 2008 file photo Russian army S-300 air defense missiles move during a final rehearsal of Victory Day parade at Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, right in the background, in Moscow. President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday, June 4, 2013 that Russia hasn't yet fulfilled a contract to send sophisticated S-300 air defense missile systems to Syria to avoid tilting the balance of power in the region. Russian officials have acknowledged that Moscow signed a deal for the delivery of the powerful missiles a few years ago, but have been coy about whether any of them have been delivered. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev, File)

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin says he considers a dispute with the United States over an archive of Jewish manuscripts to be a dead issue.

A U.S. judge in January ordered that Russia pay $50,000 a day until it turns over the so-called Schneerson Collection of books and documents to Chabad Lubavitch, a Hasidic movement within Orthodox Judaism headquartered in Brooklyn, New York.

But Russia claims the collection is state property. On Thursday, Putin visited the state library branch at the Jewish Museum where some of the books are held and said, “From this moment, I consider the question of the Schneerson library to be closed.”

blog comments powered by Disqus