Solar Impulse leaves St. Louis

Pilots Andre Borschberg, co-founder and CEO, and Dr. Bertrand Piccard, chairman, talk with reporters as the Solar Impulse sits in a specially made hangar tent at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Thursday May 23, 2013. The solar plane landed early Thursday at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport after taking off Wednesday from Phoenix. The plane, with a wingspan of 208 feet (as long as a Boeing 747), will be on display Friday and Saturday. (AP Photo/Star-Telegram, Rodger Mallison)
Pilots Andre Borschberg, co-founder and CEO, and Dr. Bertrand Piccard, chairman, talk with reporters as the Solar Impulse sits in a specially made hangar tent at Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, Thursday May 23, 2013. The solar plane landed early Thursday at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport after taking off Wednesday from Phoenix. The plane, with a wingspan of 208 feet (as long as a Boeing 747), will be on display Friday and Saturday. (AP Photo/Star-Telegram, Rodger Mallison)

ST. LOUIS (AP) — After 10 days in St. Louis, the first plane that can fly day or night without fuel is on its way to Cincinnati.

Solar Impulse started its cross-country trip in Northern California on May 3. It arrived in St. Louis on June 4. The plane took off from Lambert Airport early Friday.

After a stop in Cincinnati it will continue on to Washington before eventually ending the journey in New York. The plane flies at a speed of about 40 mph and carries only the pilot.

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