Google Glass makes its way to Kansas

google glass

[lin_video src=http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/embed/player.js?aspect_ratio=16x9&auto_next=1&auto_start=0&div_id=videoplayer-1374446635&height=480&page_count=5&pf_id=9622&show_title=1&va_id=4151957&width=640&windows=1 service=syndicaster width=640 height=480 div_id=videoplayer-1374446635 type=script]

If smart phones and tablets weren’t convenient enough, here’s a device that takes out one step – reaching into your pocket.

Google Glass is a device you wear like a pair of glasses, that Matt Moody says is one of the best yet.

“[It] gives you a screen to where you can see text messages, you can see your e-mail, you can get navigation, you can do Google searches, um, and then there’s a camera that’s also built in right next to the screen that’s on there that lets you instantly record video or take photos with speech.”

Google asked people to post online what they would do if they got their hands on Glass. As the digital media director for a Kansas company called Eagle Communications, Moody says he wants to use it to make work more efficient.

“I really just said that we were going to use them for our local news network, um, reporters would go out and use them in the field and our spotters for severe weather,” he says.

So Moody and about 8,000 others threw down $1,500 to be the first to try them out and let the company monitor how they use them.

“The coolest thing that I’ve noticed is navigation,” Moody says, “So when you’re walking somewhere it actually just pops up right in your vision and gives you turn by turn directions.”

With a camera so easily accessible, there are some privacy concerns.

“From what I’ve seen it would be no different than a phone,” Moody says, “And, I mean, there have been cameras that are small enough to be privacy issues long before this came along.”

Moody says people in the Midwest could find different uses than the rest of the country.

“With agriculture, you could apply a lot of the same type of contextual and recognition with the device that it would make things really nice, anything that you can do hands free.”

Moody expects we’ll see Google Glass on shelves by next year for about $500 each.

blog comments powered by Disqus