Turkey: No tolerance for Kurdish entity in Syria

A woman walks past graffiti painted by protesters including a crossed out swastika and the term 'Adolf Erdogan' in the city's Kugulu Park, where a group continue reading books, dancing or playing musical instruments in Ankara, Turkey, Saturday, June 8, 2013.  A senior European Union official, the EU enlargement commissioner Stefan Fule, on Friday criticized Turkish police's harsh crackdown on protesters in the last week, asked that abusers be investigated and punished and told an audience that included Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, that as a EU-candidate country, Turkey should aspire to the highest standards of democracy.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
A woman walks past graffiti painted by protesters including a crossed out swastika and the term 'Adolf Erdogan' in the city's Kugulu Park, where a group continue reading books, dancing or playing musical instruments in Ankara, Turkey, Saturday, June 8, 2013. A senior European Union official, the EU enlargement commissioner Stefan Fule, on Friday criticized Turkish police's harsh crackdown on protesters in the last week, asked that abusers be investigated and punished and told an audience that included Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, that as a EU-candidate country, Turkey should aspire to the highest standards of democracy.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s deputy prime minister says his country supports Syria’s territorial integrity and won’t tolerate the creation of a “de facto” Syrian Kurdish entity on its frontiers.

Speaking to reporters Monday, Bulent Arinc would not spell out what Turkey would do prevent any such entity from coming about but said it would act carefully and in a cool-headed manner.

Authorities here have been concerned over Syrian Kurdish militants’ recent strengthening of power in areas bordering Turkey.

The concerns have been heightened by reports that Kurds in Syria are preparing to form an autonomous region in those areas.

Last week, a Syrian Kurdish group — affiliated with Turkey’s own autonomy-seeking Kurdish rebels — took control of a town on the border with Turkey after fighting radical Islamic groups.

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