Police chief says Boulder Creek levels dropping, conditions remain dangerous

Boulder Creek flows at high speed next to a road closed off by debris from days of rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
Boulder Creek flows at high speed next to a road closed off by debris from days of rain and flooding, at the base of Boulder Canyon, Colo., Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. People in Boulder were ordered to evacuate as water rose to dangerous levels amid a storm system that has been dropping rain for a week. Rescuers struggled to reach dozens of people cut off by flooding in mountain communities, while residents in the Denver area and other areas were warned to stay off flooded streets. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — Boulder’s police chief says things are looking better hours after city officials sent notice to about 4,000 people living along Boulder Creek to leave their homes.

Chief Mark Beckner toured the city early Friday to assess the flood damage and says the creek has dropped from its peak flow.

But he tells the Daily Camera conditions remain dangerous and he is shocked at the amount of water still flowing into the streets.

Late Thursday night, warning sirens blared and officials told about 4,000 residents living near the creek to head to higher ground.

The city’s Office of Emergency Management says debris and mud coming off the mountainsides caused water to back up at the mouth of the Boulder Canyon, resulting in the creek’s rapid rise.

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