Kenya shootings have possible Kansas City ties

Heavy smoke rises from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi Kenya Monday Sept. 23 2013. Multiple large blasts have rocked the mall where a hostage siege is in its third day. Associated Press reporters on the scene heard multiple blasts and a barrage of gunfire. Security forces have been attempting to rescue an unknown number of hostages inside the mall held by al-Qaida-linked terrorists. (AP Photo/ Jerome Delay)
Heavy smoke rises from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi Kenya Monday Sept. 23 2013. Multiple large blasts have rocked the mall where a hostage siege is in its third day. Associated Press reporters on the scene heard multiple blasts and a barrage of gunfire. Security forces have been attempting to rescue an unknown number of hostages inside the mall held by al-Qaida-linked terrorists. (AP Photo/ Jerome Delay)

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TOPEKA, KS — Some new developments in the story of the terrorist attack at a mall in Kenya. The group behind the deadly Kenyan mall attack has said some of shooters involved are Americans. Nicolette Schleisman reports on possible ties the terrorist group has to Kansas City.

A deadly two day attack at a Nairobi mall in Kenya. 68 people dead and hundreds injured.
Kenya’s President said the attackers are still inside the mall – holding people hostage.

“They shall not get away with their despicable, beastly acts,” said Uhuru Kenyatta, Kenyan President.

Terrorist, group Al-Shabaab has claimed responsibility, and CNN reports the group says ‘one of the shooters is from Kansas City.’

According to the same CNN report, ‘Al-Shabaab identified that member as 27-year-old Mustafe Noorudiin.

The state department has not confirmed that claim.

Washburn University professor, Chris Hamilton says if it is true, he does not believe it is a sign of a larger terrorist organization in the area.

“The connections are foggy. There were Hamas sympathizers in Kansas City back in the 90’s and some al Qaeda sympathizers around Columbia,” said Hamilton.

Hamilton says extremist Islamic groups do not necessarily target Americans as recruits into their organizations.

“Home grown terrorists, well that’s pretty much Americans learning about Islam and the extremist Islamic terrorist groups online,” said Hamilton.

Tracking these home grown terrorists is not always easy.

“You have like the Boston bombers that slipped through the net. And there’s always going to be someone that’s going to slip through some kind of super surveillance net, and I think we might want to remember that,” said Hamilton.

Hamilton says these home grown terrorists are much less likely to attack on American soil. They usually go overseas to join in the fighting over there.

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