After Shutdown, Kansans wonder what’s next

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Administrators and employees at the Brown vs Board of Education site were only at work long enough to prepare for a leave of absence without an end in sight Tuesday morning.

Even if rangers wanted to work for free to keep the site open for tours, they can’t.  “I know most of the staff would be volunteering right now, to keep the doors open, we can’ even do that, ” said Dave Smith, superintendent.

Across the state, federal employees received furlough notices; 700 at the Kansas National Guard, one third of its federal workforce, “When we lose that percentage of our full time work force, it’s going to have a significant impact on our day to day operations,” said Maj. Gen. Lee Tafanelli, the state Adjutant General.

Tafanlli says unlike the summer sequester there will be staffing in place to maintain essential functions.  When the shutdown is over the long term problems could start,  Any time we have our employees and their families impacted in this manner it’s a significant morale issue and that’s something I’m very concerned with long term.”

Drill, important training for National Guard units, this weekend is also in doubt.  Tafanelli says the guard will still have access to enough resources to respond to a disaster if needed.  “There are provisions that if we do have a disaster we can bring in the necessary resources to handle that.”

Spirits down at Lake Perry as well.  People staying at campgrounds run by the Army Corps of Engineers have been told to leave by Tuesday night said Kenneth Wade, Operations Project Manager at Lake Perry.

Vacations, work weeks, and paychecks all cut short by gridlock in Washington, D.C.

 

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