Preventing Financial Abuse

financial abuse

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HOLTON, KS — It targets the elderly, and state officials are trying to use education to prevent Kansans from being the target of a scam.

Nicolette Schleisman has the story of an elderly woman who was the target of scammers, that left her phone ringing off the hook.

Paulette Schrick thought she was lucky.

“The first time was 2 years ago, my husband had passed away less than one month later, I got a telephone call on a mega million winnings, and because I was in a vulnerable state I was not as alert as I normally am to answer questions. And it went on and on and on for days and months,” said Schrick.

Schrick says that first scam came in 2011, she was getting 50 calls a day, from people trying to get money from her.

“Did I lose money? The first time a little bit, but they kept after me for more and more and more. And I wouldn’t do it,” said Schrick.

Schrick did not want to say how much money she lost to these scammers.
And now, she says she is the victim of another attack, getting 20 calls a day from a different number. But this time, she is being more careful.

“I never say the yes word. They want to know something, I always answer with a full sentence, I say ‘I am married’ or ‘I do not want to give you a beneficiary name.'”

That is partly why the Kansas Department of Aging and Disability services teamed up with the Attorney General’s office, to teach older adults how to keep their money safe.
They say to never give out your personal information like social security or a credit card to claim a prize. And to confirm any information through the Attorney General’s office to see if they are a credible and reliable source.
And most importantly, it is always o.k. to say “no” and hang up the phone or close the door.

The Attorney General’s Office says most scams targeting the elderly are through phone calls, email messages or even someone coming to the front door. The Attorney General’s Office says most scams targeting the elderly are through phone calls, e-mail messages or even someone coming to the front door.

The Attorney General’s Office another information session in Atchison in two weeks on Thursday, October 17th.

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