Okla. pharmacy won’t give drug for Mo. execution

In this handout photo from the Missouri Correctional offices, Michael Anthony Taylor of Kansas City is shown. The Apothecary Shoppe, of Tulsa, submitted a sealed response to Taylor's lawsuit accusing it of illegally providing Missouri with a made-to-order drug to be used in his lethal injection. The company hasn't publicly acknowledged that it supplies a compounded version of pentobarbital to Missouri for use in lethal injections, as Taylor alleges, and says it can't because of a Missouri law requiring the identities of those on the state's execution team to be kept confidential. (AP Photo/Missouri Correctional Office)
In this handout photo from the Missouri Correctional offices, Michael Anthony Taylor of Kansas City is shown. The Apothecary Shoppe, of Tulsa, submitted a sealed response to Taylor's lawsuit accusing it of illegally providing Missouri with a made-to-order drug to be used in his lethal injection. The company hasn't publicly acknowledged that it supplies a compounded version of pentobarbital to Missouri for use in lethal injections, as Taylor alleges, and says it can't because of a Missouri law requiring the identities of those on the state's execution team to be kept confidential. (AP Photo/Missouri Correctional Office)

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – An Oklahoma pharmacy has agreed not to provide Missouri with a drug for a scheduled execution next week, but it’s unclear whether the decision will delay the lethal injection.

Court documents filed late Monday say death row inmate Michael Taylor has reached an agreement in his lawsuit against The Apothecary Shoppe.

His attorneys say the Tulsa compounding pharmacy was providing a drug for his Feb. 26 execution that could cause “inhumane pain.” The court documents say the company won’t prepare or provide any drug for the execution.

However, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon indicated last week that the state could move forward with the execution even after a judge temporarily blocked the company from providing the drug.

A hearing is set for Tuesday in the case.

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