Area gun experts have mixed feelings on fingerprint gun technology

We’ve all heard of smartphones, but what about smart guns? New fingerprint technology is sparking some debate among local gun enthusiasts.

“I see both positives and negatives with it,” says owner of Holsters and more, Jerry Aday.

It’s fingerprint technology like that on a new i-Phone, but put toward a very different product.

“The positive is if you’re using it for self defense, it can’t be taken away from you and used against you,” Aday says.

He adds, he’d like to sell fingerprinted guns, but fears they could start out with glitches.

“When you’re defending you’re life, you don’t really want a glitch, how reliable is it going to be early,” Aday says.

He says for many, the decision will come down to dollars. With some guns costing about $300 and the sensor costing another $300, Aday says you’re essentially doubling the price of your firearm.

“It’s going to be cost prohibitive for a lot of people for a long time,” he adds.

Concealed carry and law enforcement instructor Scott Young has serious concerns.

“Say for example you need your firearm in a defensive situation, you have gloves on, your hands are dirty, you get blood on your hands,” Young says, “Will those still read? Okay, so now you have a completely useless defensive tool.”

Young says it’s all about training.

“Proper techniques of securing your firearms, of training yourself to retain your firearms and being proficient, there’s a lot of different things that are much better options,” Young says.

“I think it’s a great idea,” says Aday, “And I’d like to see more of it because we’re getting more and more people carrying guns and wanting to be part of it but they may not have the strength or may not have the knowledge to use it without some help.”

Some proponents of fingerprint technology say it could reduce the number of accidents with children and guns.

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